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January 24, 2008

Facts for Features Special Edition

Super Bowl XLII

Super Bowl XLII will be played Feb. 3 at University of Phoenix Stadium in Glendale, Ariz. To commemorate this occasion, the Census Bureau has compiled a collection of facts examining the demographics of the host area, as well as the cities represented by the contenders, in this year’s edition of our nation’s most celebrated sporting event.

New York (Giants)

Unless otherwise indicated, the data come from the 2006 American Community Survey.

1st
Where New York ranked on the list of the nation’s most populous cities. New York’s estimated population on July 1, 2006, was 8.3 million. New York gained 36,728 people from July 1, 2005, to July 1, 2006. The city has been the nation’s most populous city ever since the first census in 1790. (The Giants actually play in suburban East Rutherford, N.J., which had an estimated July 1, 2006, population of 8,931.) Sources: Population estimates <http://www.census.gov/Press-Release/www/releases/archives/population/010315.html> and historical census reports <http://www.census.gov/population/www/documentation/twps0027.html>

32%
Percentage of New York’s residents 25 and older who had a bachelor’s degree or higher in 2006; 79 percent had at least graduated from high school. The respective national figures were 27 percent and 84 percent.

39 minutes
Average amount of time it took New York’s residents to get to work. Twenty-four percent of the city’s workers drove to work alone, 6 percent carpooled and 54 percent took public transportation. Nationally, it took workers an average of 25 minutes to get to work.

48%
Percentage of New York’s residents 5 and older who spoke a language other than English at home. The national average was 20 percent.

$46,480
Median household income for New York. The national median was $48,451.

$496,400
Median home value of owner-occupied homes in New York. The national median was $185,200.

Boston (New England Patriots)

Unless otherwise indicated, the data come from the 2006 American Community Survey.

23rd
Where Boston ranked on the list of the nation’s most populous cities. Boston’s estimated population on July 1, 2006, was 595,698. Boston’s population declined by 940 people between July 1, 2005, and July 1, 2006. (The Patriots actually play in suburban Foxborough, Mass., which had an estimated July 1, 2006, population of 16,274.) Source: Population estimates <http://www.census.gov/Press-Release/www/releases/archives/population/010315.html>

42%
Percentage of Boston’s residents 25 and older who had a bachelor’s degree or higher in 2006; 84 percent had at least graduated from high school. The respective national figures were 27 percent and 84 percent.

27.7 minutes
Average amount of time it took Boston’s residents to get to work. Thirty-nine percent of the city’s workers drove to work alone, 9 percent carpooled and 32 percent took public transportation. Nationally, it took workers an average of 25 minutes to get to work.

35%
Percentage of Boston’s residents 5 and older who spoke a language other than English at home. The national average was 20 percent.

$47,974
Median household income for Boston. This is not significantly different from the national median of $48,451.

$432,800
Median value of owner-occupied homes in Boston. The national median was $185,200.

Glendale, Ariz. (host city) and vicinity

Unless otherwise indicated, the data come from the 2006 American Community Survey.

16th
Where Arizona ranked on the list of the nation’s most populous states. Arizona’s estimated population on July 1, 2007, was 6.3 million. It was the nation’s second-fastest growing state between July 1, 2006, and July 1, 2007. Source: Population estimates <http://www.census.gov/Press-Release/www/releases/archives/population/011109.html>

13th
Rank of Phoenix-Mesa-Scottsdale, Ariz., among metro areas with respect to population size. The Phoenix metro area had an estimated population of 4 million on July 1, 2006, up by 787,000 since Census 2000 — the fourth largest numerical increase in the nation. Its rate of growth during the period (24 percent) ranked 10th nationally. Source: Population estimates <http://www.census.gov/Press-Release/www/releases/archives/population/009865.html>

246,531
Population of Glendale on July 1, 2006. Glendale’s population climbed by 3,387 between July 1, 2005, and July 1, 2006. Glendale is now the 72nd most populous city in the nation. Source: Population estimates <http://www.census.gov/Press-Release/www/releases/archives/population/010315.html>

36,228
Population of Glendale in the 1970 census. Source: Historical census reports <http://www.census.gov/population/www/censusdata/hiscendata.html>

26%
Percentage of Arizona’s residents 25 or older who had a bachelor’s degree or higher in 2006; this compares with 27 percent in the Phoenix metro area and 19 percent in Glendale. The respective national figure was 27 percent.

25 minutes
Average amount of time it took Arizona’s residents to get to work. Seventy-five percent of the state’s workers drove to work alone. In the Phoenix metro area, it took an average of 26.6 minutes and 75 percent drove to work solo. In Glendale, the respective figures were 26.5 minutes and 71 percent. Nationally, they were 25 minutes and 76 percent.

28%
Percentage of Arizona’s residents 5 or older who spoke a language other than English at home. The Phoenix metro area had an identical percentage, while Glendale was at 32 percent. The national average was 20 percent.

$47,265
Median household income for Arizona. In the Phoenix metro area, the median was $51,862, and in Glendale, it was $48,455. The national median was $48,451. (Glendale was not significantly different from the national median.)

$236,500
Median value of owner-occupied homes in Arizona. The respective medians in the Phoenix metro area and Glendale were $266,300 and $243,900. The national median was $185,200.

Notes:

  • The average amount of time it took residents to get to work was not significantly different between Glendale and Boston, nor Glendale and the Phoenix-Mesa-Scottsdale metropolitan area.
  • The percentage of workers who drove to work alone was not significantly different between Arizona and the Phoenix-Mesa-Scottsdale metropolitan area.
  • The percentage of people 5 or older who spoke a language other than English at home was not significantly different between Boston and Glendale.
  • The median household income was not significantly different between Boston and Glendale. In addition, Boston was not significantly different from New York or Arizona. Glendale was also not significantly different from New York or Arizona.

“Special Editions” of the U.S. Census Bureau’s Facts for Features are issued to provide background information for lesser known observances, anniversaries of historic events and other timely topics in the news.

Editor’s note: The preceding data were collected from a variety of sources and may be subject to sampling variability and other sources of error. Facts for Features are customarily released about two months before an observance in order to accommodate magazine production timelines. Questions or comments should be directed to the Census Bureau’s Public Information Office: telephone: 301-763-3030; fax: 301-763-3762; or e-mail: <pio@census.gov>.